June 19, 2012 at 10:22am
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Angel Soldier by Lee Yong Baek
Tiger Head 1 by Ji Yong-Ho
'Bioluminescent bloom makes beach a magical minefield'

Angel Soldier by Lee Yong Baek

Tiger Head 1 by Ji Yong-Ho

'Bioluminescent bloom makes beach a magical minefield'

March 25, 2012 at 11:26am
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Years ago, at the “beginning” of the “handmade movement,” I had a brief conversation with a professor about the semantic and apparent differences among “art,” “craft,” and “craftsy,” and recently brought it up again when speaking with a gentleman about aptitudes, teaching methods, sport, and expert status (archery, the Olympics, woodworkers, etc).

Yesterday my sister and I went to see The Hunger Games and as we sat at the end of the movie, listening to the second-best piece of music the movie franchise-as-yet has to offer (The Arcade Fire’s “Abraham’s Daughter”) we talked a little about the trailer versus the movie, and where each excelled in production versus the other. Only a little, because we’re old and plumb can’t stay out and about past ten or eleven o’clock. (My favorite piece of music surrounding the whole thing, you can guess, is “Deep Shadow,” the music for trailer #1, above, composed by T.T.L.) The adaptation, book(s), and the writing itself are a whole ‘nother can of worms. Marinating in their own waste. Really. I’m partly sorry for myself that I’m giving this all more legitimacy. But the music! And…

Even if not outright, we all know about Trajan, and blue plus orange, and Clint Mansell/Kronos Quartet’s “Lux Aeterna.” Movie trailer or poster or hook as art form has been ruminated upon (terrible syntax ftw?) by individuals more eloquent and learned than I, but damn if I don’t miss the days when part of my job legit-involved watching movie trailers, and being able to ponder this all and its artistic and cultural implications in its most raw state.

Anatomy of a Tear-Jerker (Wall St. Journal)

The Art of the Modern Movie Trailer (Fresh Air All Things Considered. Too many tabs open, ha.)

'Hunger Games' Trailer May Be Beginning of New Trend (LA Times)

July 3, 2011 at 1:12pm
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Recently I have been particularly digging baking things with coarse sea salt (and if a recipe doesn’t call for it, adding more than the recommended amount, rebel rebel). It is so nice to get a little bit of contrasting saltiness in something homey and sweet like chocolate chip cookies (last week) or brownies (yesterday).
I immediately turned into Antieau Gallery in New Orleans a few months back when I saw the sign hanging outside, because I knew just from that that it was a place I would like. Photos don’t do any of the stuff in the gallery justice. (Bryan Cunningham)
The 8th Day, from a pinboard called “sin cara” (fascinating idea), that only took about ten clicks and a copy/paste to find the project/source/artists. Seriously, that’s fantastic for something pinned (or for that matter ffffound) via tumblr. 

Recently I have been particularly digging baking things with coarse sea salt (and if a recipe doesn’t call for it, adding more than the recommended amount, rebel rebel). It is so nice to get a little bit of contrasting saltiness in something homey and sweet like chocolate chip cookies (last week) or brownies (yesterday).

I immediately turned into Antieau Gallery in New Orleans a few months back when I saw the sign hanging outside, because I knew just from that that it was a place I would like. Photos don’t do any of the stuff in the gallery justice. (Bryan Cunningham)

The 8th Day, from a pinboard called “sin cara” (fascinating idea), that only took about ten clicks and a copy/paste to find the project/source/artists. Seriously, that’s fantastic for something pinned (or for that matter ffffound) via tumblr. 

June 19, 2011 at 12:28pm
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Oh darn, one of the many things that I’m distinctly not is a blogger. Tiny rituals like this help me stay sane, though, so I’m going to try to get back to this little thing. It’s very easy for me to feel underwater, and forget the things I like, and like to do. 

Nutmegger Workshop
Honey & Jam: chocolate chip cookies
Evan B. Harris
Old signs! Baking! Forests, artists. Listening to new music and sitting outside and reading and drawing woodgrain. 

Oh darn, one of the many things that I’m distinctly not is a blogger. Tiny rituals like this help me stay sane, though, so I’m going to try to get back to this little thing. It’s very easy for me to feel underwater, and forget the things I like, and like to do. 

Nutmegger Workshop

Honey & Jam: chocolate chip cookies

Evan B. Harris

Old signs! Baking! Forests, artists. Listening to new music and sitting outside and reading and drawing woodgrain. 

November 20, 2010 at 6:49pm
2 notes

I’ve been obsessed with Pinterest lately. It’s like the answer to all my images-I-like plus inspiration-organization-and-saving desires, and it almost solves one of the huge problems I have with people linking pictures, which is a lot of times not being able to track a source or find an artist or designer.

pinterest.com/picapicapie

^ Here’s mine!

October 23, 2010 at 4:50pm
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Okay, cool. Finally a post the way I intended from the beginning. 
A search for reference pictures for: fox kits > fox babies > Inuit fox art > what followed:
Drawn and Quarterly Bookstore had a post linking that particular photo by William Wegman, but the link was broken. (that copy found on Style Me to the Moon.) A quick scroll down to
a little feature about art duo Tin Can Forest. 
Today I saw District 9 for the first time (image from the Guardian)—totally engrossing. I very much liked the documentary treatment in the first quarter or so, and though the style transition was a little muddled I didn’t really care (it wouldn’t have led anywhere story-wise but I really wanted to see more of the dystopian Johannesburg as far as urban/institutional design, e.g., the sheet targets, the person symbols [see: Walking Men Worldwide]). 
I think I have come to appreciate breaking-the-fourth-wall gore on the camera lens. For the record, I didn’t particularly enjoy it in Children of Men. (I know I’m a sucker.) Potentially inversely related: I am listening right now to Die Antwoord. Times change, people change.

Okay, cool. Finally a post the way I intended from the beginning. 

A search for reference pictures for: fox kits > fox babies > Inuit fox art > what followed:

Drawn and Quarterly Bookstore had a post linking that particular photo by William Wegman, but the link was broken. (that copy found on Style Me to the Moon.) A quick scroll down to

a little feature about art duo Tin Can Forest

Today I saw District 9 for the first time (image from the Guardian)—totally engrossing. I very much liked the documentary treatment in the first quarter or so, and though the style transition was a little muddled I didn’t really care (it wouldn’t have led anywhere story-wise but I really wanted to see more of the dystopian Johannesburg as far as urban/institutional design, e.g., the sheet targets, the person symbols [see: Walking Men Worldwide]). 

I think I have come to appreciate breaking-the-fourth-wall gore on the camera lens. For the record, I didn’t particularly enjoy it in Children of Men. (I know I’m a sucker.) Potentially inversely related: I am listening right now to Die Antwoord. Times change, people change.

September 25, 2010 at 4:58pm
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Why I Need to Live in a Forest, Reason 82: I want to listen to birds, and am easily distracted by people’s admittedly mild volume. Boo, I’m going for a bike ride and then to get some chocolate. For it is again time to make the consummate Magnolia Bakery peanut butter cookies, graciously brought to us by Smitten Kitchen.
This felt pillow by Llubav Choy Duer (via design*sponge) is for me especially nice because it seems so accessible. The right degrees of simple and fancy, and not too delicate. 
tori bag by minä perhonen—I typed w in my browser and the url popped up, but I don’t remember having visited it recently, though I do recall saving and failing to label some images months ago from Hello Sandwich and ii-ne-kore. Little serendipities!
Tallgrass prairie in Kansas (via the US National Archives flickr)—what a wealth of history and inspiration in all the national and state archives’ and museums’ flickrs. I like reading historial journalism, especially in the disasters category (why, self?), and these help immensely as far as envisioning people and places and events of really-not-that-long-ago.

Why I Need to Live in a Forest, Reason 82: I want to listen to birds, and am easily distracted by people’s admittedly mild volume. Boo, I’m going for a bike ride and then to get some chocolate. For it is again time to make the consummate Magnolia Bakery peanut butter cookies, graciously brought to us by Smitten Kitchen.

This felt pillow by Llubav Choy Duer (via design*sponge) is for me especially nice because it seems so accessible. The right degrees of simple and fancy, and not too delicate. 

tori bag by minä perhonen—I typed w in my browser and the url popped up, but I don’t remember having visited it recently, though I do recall saving and failing to label some images months ago from Hello Sandwich and ii-ne-kore. Little serendipities!

Tallgrass prairie in Kansas (via the US National Archives flickr)—what a wealth of history and inspiration in all the national and state archives’ and museums’ flickrs. I like reading historial journalism, especially in the disasters category (why, self?), and these help immensely as far as envisioning people and places and events of really-not-that-long-ago.

September 21, 2010 at 2:05pm
1 note
Oops, I remember now why I don’t make photosets or text posts. Guess I’ll have to suck it up and make a theme from scratch somewhere else someday soon.
1 Simple Anatomy, Slow Burn by John Byrd (via my catalog of Full & Spare, a ceramics show at FSU’s Museum of Fine Arts)
2 A Gallery of Foxes (via hello jenuine) earlier this year in Uppercase Magazine—apparently Uppercase is capital stuff (do u liek my pun?) and I’m certain I’ve come across specials and art and editions featured in it, but I just never noted it for itself. This is now remedied.
3 Seconds by Jason Miller (via sfgirlbybay)
Happy Autumn! Down here that just means it rains every day. I love rain every day! Fall also means I hate myself anew for moving away from Tallahassee and my alma mater, because I miss not only the people, but the change in weather, and fun, Autumnal staples like Geek Night. Other things like Noah Baumbach’s Kicking and Screaming—“Following graduation, a handful of college students do nothing and talk about it wittily”—sitting in my Netflix queue don’t help either.  
To drown my sorrows, or at least splash around in them just enough so that I can still drive home afterward, I might as well go try some of that Southern Tier Pumking that everyone is talking about! 

Oops, I remember now why I don’t make photosets or text posts. Guess I’ll have to suck it up and make a theme from scratch somewhere else someday soon.

Simple Anatomy, Slow Burn by John Byrd (via my catalog of Full & Spare, a ceramics show at FSU’s Museum of Fine Arts)

A Gallery of Foxes (via hello jenuine) earlier this year in Uppercase Magazine—apparently Uppercase is capital stuff (do u liek my pun?) and I’m certain I’ve come across specials and art and editions featured in it, but I just never noted it for itself. This is now remedied.

Seconds by Jason Miller (via sfgirlbybay)

Happy Autumn! Down here that just means it rains every day. I love rain every day! Fall also means I hate myself anew for moving away from Tallahassee and my alma mater, because I miss not only the people, but the change in weather, and fun, Autumnal staples like Geek Night. Other things like Noah Baumbach’s Kicking and Screaming—“Following graduation, a handful of college students do nothing and talk about it wittily”—sitting in my Netflix queue don’t help either.  

To drown my sorrows, or at least splash around in them just enough so that I can still drive home afterward, I might as well go try some of that Southern Tier Pumking that everyone is talking about! 

September 12, 2010 at 8:49pm
2 notes
Oh no, I seem to have gotten into a “mood” and cleared my browser’s cache. That leads to fixing permissions, verifying the disk, and then, the ultimate in autumnal spring computer cleaning: formatting and reorganizing from scratch. Uh oh. I don’t remember exactly how I stumbled upon the last of these, but thank goodness for tabbed browsing and del.icio.us!
Sophia Arnold, via all the mountains
PPcut collection by Furze Chan, via designworklife and ohjoy!
moomah cafe in New York, branding by Apartment One, and them I believe via Brand New (I must have already spent a couple of hours going through this omg), and more lovely photos at decor8 and Kim Cornelison

Oh no, I seem to have gotten into a “mood” and cleared my browser’s cache. That leads to fixing permissions, verifying the disk, and then, the ultimate in autumnal spring computer cleaning: formatting and reorganizing from scratch. Uh oh. I don’t remember exactly how I stumbled upon the last of these, but thank goodness for tabbed browsing and del.icio.us!

Sophia Arnold, via all the mountains

PPcut collection by Furze Chan, via designworklife and ohjoy!

moomah cafe in New York, branding by Apartment One, and them I believe via Brand New (I must have already spent a couple of hours going through this omg), and more lovely photos at decor8 and Kim Cornelison

September 1, 2010 at 3:14pm
3 notes
Sorry. I was working for the Census back there, and drinking some fancy new beers. And moving, and not getting internet until five hours ago. It was a nice experiment going without it, but I think all I really needed to get rid of was facebook. Profit.
David Lebovitz is to food as the Sartorialist is to fashion, I think. But while I’ll always be detached from the latter as I’ll never be fashionable, baking is something I can do, and can work on, and I can drool over chefs and bakers and take notes on places to visit and things on which to nom. (his whole blog, really, but particularly this recipe for salted butter chocolate chip cookies)
I was reading Andrew W.K.’s twitter yesterday for encouragement at work, so I will describe the type on these sweet chocolate wrappers by Nineteen Seventy-Three as party-weighted. (via black*eiffel) I also noticed some notebooks with all-over patterns by Sanna Annukka, very neat.
"Bento Time" is a book about people and their bento boxes. (via ii-ne-kore) It’s tangential, but I am reminded of Spam musubi. I tried, but I don’t think I’ll ever get that.

Sorry. I was working for the Census back there, and drinking some fancy new beers. And moving, and not getting internet until five hours ago. It was a nice experiment going without it, but I think all I really needed to get rid of was facebook. Profit.

David Lebovitz is to food as the Sartorialist is to fashion, I think. But while I’ll always be detached from the latter as I’ll never be fashionable, baking is something I can do, and can work on, and I can drool over chefs and bakers and take notes on places to visit and things on which to nom. (his whole blog, really, but particularly this recipe for salted butter chocolate chip cookies)

I was reading Andrew W.K.’s twitter yesterday for encouragement at work, so I will describe the type on these sweet chocolate wrappers by Nineteen Seventy-Three as party-weighted. (via black*eiffel) I also noticed some notebooks with all-over patterns by Sanna Annukka, very neat.

"Bento Time" is a book about people and their bento boxes. (via ii-ne-kore) It’s tangential, but I am reminded of Spam musubi. I tried, but I don’t think I’ll ever get that.